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« Where will you walk? | Main | Leaders Must Reinvent and Destroy »

December 14, 2005

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I don't know if resumes are so yesterday because many still don't read blogs, but blogs should be the number 1 way to know if (a) I want to hire you and if (b) I want to work for you. If a blog is done properly, postings are true, candid, and revealing. Of course, revealing the character and passion of the author. If you did a survey of not bloggers, how many actually realize the opportunity they have through blogs?

Here's the thing. I realize that you can get inside the head of a blogger. That might even effectively help you understand him a bit better than an interview. But there are many of us out there that don't blog. Because writing a good blog takes time and effort. Our families may preclude that time.

Relying on blogs is great if it's there, but don't ding me for not having one, and moreover know that I won't be pulled away from working an extra hour because I'm coming up with my next post.

Zorkerman

B and Z:

Good points! Yes, it is ONE tool. But if I were looking for work, particularly in a field related to blogging (Sebastian is a good example) or social media, I would have a blog. If looking for a dental assistant, finding one who blogs would be informational, but not as relevent.

Z, your comment on working an extra hour. a blog should never get in the way of someone doing their best (I know it does some times) work. That said, you are probably working too much anyway!

I think recruiters should just take a broad approach and utilize several of the tools at their disposal. Some people don't have blogs - fine, they'll use resumes, cover letters and interviews for those candidates. But they could also search for blogs written by candidates who apply to them, in case they find one and learn about that person. They can also recruit via the blogosphere - they may find candidates online who haven't applied for the job but who are experts in that line of work and could be approached. It's just another tool that can help out recruiters and can be a career advancing tool for people who like blogging.

That doesn't mean everyone should have one. It's only career-advancing if it's a good blog. And of course, Zorkerman is correct, that does take time and effort.

Lynda Gratton wrote a challenging book called The Democratic Enterprise. In it she noted that some UK companies are looking for two traits - determination and willingness to learn. Question: would authoring a blog be a good indicator that a person is a determined learner? I think so. As noted above, it is not the one, always appropriate tool for hiring - but any company that wishes to compete with learners as employees would do well to consider those who blog.

By the way, has anyone read Gratton's book?

Michael - I have heard of, but not read, Gratton's book.

I do think that authoring a blog CAN be an indicator that someone is a learner, but is not always the case. It depends on the content and whether the blooger seems to seek input and perspectives. Some personal blogs are really more like personal journals and I don't know if this would indicate a thirst for learning on its own.

And we must be careful on our blogs, too. Some would reveal to the recruiter that they are immature and unprofessional. Your blog is your blog and you should make it what you want, but I think it is important to always represent yourself well and professionally.

I'm afraid that some employers might still perceive blogging as a waste of time. I'd be afraid to share this information if I was applying (a personal card-like page is a different story).

Lech: Excellent point. I think the type of company is an important consideration, for sure. As a recruiter, however, I would want to seek blogs. Perhaps this is a bit before its time, but I am suggesting that HR departments move forward in viewing professional blogs as assets and treasure trove of information.

I think it depends on your type of blog, too. If you have a personal blog, you may not want to share it.

Also, let's acknowledge that some people have been fired for blogging and that some business people have very negative perceptions about blogging.

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